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Installing Serviio 1.7, ffmpeg 3.x on Ubuntu 16.04 / Mint 18

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SparkyHenderson

Serviio newbie

Posts: 5

Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2015 9:51 pm

Post Tue Sep 20, 2016 6:29 pm

Installing Serviio 1.7, ffmpeg 3.x on Ubuntu 16.04 / Mint 18

General Notes:
There are three broad groups of actions to get Serviio up and running on Linux. First we check for Java 8, then we build and install ffmpeg with the necessary options enabled, and finally we install Serviio itself. I am using the official KDE Ubuntu derivative Kubuntu 16.04 LTS 64 bit. It is the latest LTS.

This installation is based on Kubuntu 16.04 http://kubuntu.org/ . Kubuntu is an official release of the Ubuntu project.
I also tested on a clean installation of Mint 18 using the Cinnamon desktop. It behaved exactly the same as Ubuntu.

I avoid using third party repositories whenever possible. All the software installed in these instructions either comes from the official Ubuntu/Kubuntu repositories or from the developers' web sites. With these instructions it's easy enough to build ffmpeg just the way you need it without opening yourself up to an anonymous source's choices that aren't appropriate for you.

I'm starting with a VMware virtual machine setup with 2048 MB of RAM, 2 virtual CPU cores, and a single NIC. You may be able to use less RAM, but I think a minimum of 2 CPU cores is important for smooth performance. If you choose to use my optional RAM drive trick (towards the end) to speed up ffmpeg transcoding, you will be very glad you had 2 or more CPUs. I have tested the virtual machine under VMware's vSphere 6, Workstation 11, and Fusion 8.5. (I am a VMware nerd.) I do my installations logged in as root. You may want to do all this as a sudoer by prepending "sudo" to all the commands below. Be my guest, but I would lose my mind; my mind is already wandering just thinking about it.

Quick refresher - If you need to unlock the root account in Ubuntu, first set the root password, then unlock the account like this (please lock it back up when you're done):
  Code:
sudo passwd root
sudo passwd -u root


Keywords:
Serviio, Linux, server, media server, headless, DLNA UPnP, Kubuntu, Ubuntu, Java, Oracle, JRE, ffmpeg, build, NAS, lossless, flac, wav, mpc, lossy, mp3, ogg, vorbis, Ubuntu 15.04, Kubuntu 15.04, Ubuntu 15.10, Kubuntu 15.10, Ubuntu 16.04, Kubuntu 16.04, systemd

Just a thought! - You virtual machine builders may want to take a snapshot here. (We'll do this a few times throughout this set of instructions.)

I recommend you install and use aptitude. The options are just a little different from apt and apt-get, but you can accomplish all the same tasks. (I like aptitude for its safe-upgrade option.)


******************************************************************************************
Optional - Install Oracle Java
******************************************************************************************
Notes:
If you already have Java 8 installed then you can get right to work building ffmpeg. If you're happy with the openjdk version "1.8.0_91" then by all means use it and skip down to the next secion. Just make sure you have 1.8.0_91 or newer for Serviio 1.7.

In earlier versions of Serviio I used Oracle's Java. Here's how I removed Open JDK and installed Oracle Java.

I am using the /etc/alternatives symlink method to make Java accessible by using the existing path.

The file and directory permissions are set appropriately from the tar file. If you feel the need to tweak them, you'll want the rw for user and ro for group. You want all the directorires to have the x flag set for all.

You will have to set ownership for the files. Don't worry! The instructions are all here.

It is possible to have multiple Java runtime engines on your system, but it will require a slightly different set of instructions to get Serviio running. The basics of that type of setup are 1 - do not remove the other Java runtimes, 2 - do not set any of the symlinks in these instructions, and 3 - either use an environment variable that works with serviio.sh or edit your serviio.sh . This is a bit outside the scope of these instructions, but I'll be happy to write up explicit instructions if you ask.


Steps:
First let's determine if any sort of Java is installed.
  Code:
java -version

- no double dash, only a single dash, I always forget

Find and remove or disable the existing Java. Here are a couple ways to find them. Cut and paste:
  Code:
apt list --installed | grep java
apt list --installed | grep jdk

- there are lots of other ways to do this too, but these worked for me

Either remove with apt, remove from path, or un-symlink them. I chose to remove my OpenJDK completely. This worked for me:
  Code:
apt-get remove openjdk-8-jre openjdk-8-jre-headless java-common


Search for stray executable or symlinks of "java" and either get rid of them or point them to the new install a bit later. Cut and paste:
  Code:
find / -type f -name java -executable -exec ls -alF {} \;

- find executable files named java and display their locations
- the ls -alF option will show you the dereferenced symlink
- Note - The space between the curly braces and the backslash is necessary.

  Code:
find / -type l -name java -executable -exec ls -alF {} \;

- If you find symlinks you should double check to what they are pointing. Check the executables you found.
- Note - The space between the curly braces and the backslash is necessary.

Double check your /etc/alternatives directory for a symlink to Java too just to be sure.

Download the appropriate xxxxxx-jre-8uxx-linux for your system (mine was server-jre-8u92-linux-x64.tar.gz). I go to Oracle.com -> downloads -> Java for developers then choose the server JRE for my environment.

Change directory into /usr/lib . Cut and paste:
  Code:
cd /usr/lib


Untar your Java 8 download into /usr/lib . Something like this:
  Code:
tar xf /some/path/to/the-jre/server-jre-8u92-linux-x64.tar.gz


The ownership user and group of the files will be all wrong!!! Set the ownership and group to root.
  Code:
chown -R root:root /usr/lib/jdk-whatever-version-you-are-using


Make a few symlinks so we don't have to add anything to the path. Edit the command to match the version you just installed.
  Code:
ln -s /usr/lib/jdk1.8.0_92/bin/java /etc/alternatives/java && \
ln -s /etc/alternatives/java /usr/bin/java


You're done with this. Change to a directory off the path and run this test just to prove everything is OK.
  Code:
java -version


My results were:
java version "1.8.0_92"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_92-b14)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.92-b14, mixed mode)

Just a thought! - You virtual machine builders may want to take a snapshot here.

******************************************************************************************
ffmpeg build
******************************************************************************************
Notes:
Serviio now provides ffmpeg-3.0.2.tar.bz2 from their download page. They seem to recommend using it instead of more recent versions, and they may have patched it a bit too. They also have links to libRTMP 2.4+ (circa 2013) and the very standard Lame MP3 Encoder (v. 3.99.5) to be built alongside the ffmpeg. I didn't need to build those in order to build ffmpeg. The libraries for the latest versions were already available from the Ubuntu repos for 16.04 LTS. You're mileage may vary.

I chose to use the most recent verion in the 3.1 branch, which is FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace", from ffmpeg.org and the available dev libraries from the Ubuntu repos. I did test the 3.0.2 from Serviio too, and it works fine, but 3.1.3 will be my primary focus. I will also test 3.0.3, which is also the most current version from the 3.0.x branch.

Ubuntu 16.04 does once again included ffmpeg in its repositories, but it's too little too late. It's an older version that we can't use. It wasn't even in the repositories for Ubu 14.04, so I guess this is an improvment, but still not good enough for us. Be sure to remove any old ffmpeg versions from your system before proceeding.

Rather than build the version provided by Serviio, I'm starting my build with the latest of ffmpeg here because they fix a lot of bugs at ffmpeg.org and I could control all the options. 3.0.2 from Serviio might be a more conservative way to go and I included instructions below.

I adapted (and slightly expanded) the build instructions from http://wiki.serviio.org/doku.php?id=build_ffmpeg_linux . I owe the authors of this linked web page a debt of gratitude. Once I opened my mind you taught me a ton. Thank you very much!

The options for the apt-get (I used aptitude) and configure parameters are in order of appearance (mostly) from ffmpeg's ./configure --help

New for Serviio 1.7 and ffmpeg3.x is the addition of the libx265-dev library.

Wanna go really fast? Copy and paste one of these convenience copies, and let it rip:
Want to go step by step and read the explanations? Then skip down to "Step by step instructions:" section below.

Convenience copy for v3.1.3 from ffmpeg.org
  Code:
apt-get -y install build-essential yasm pkg-config libass-dev \
libfaac-dev libmp3lame-dev libopencore-amrnb-dev \
libopencore-amrwb-dev librtmp-dev libspeex-dev libtheora-dev \
libvorbis-dev libx264-dev libxvidcore-dev libx11-dev \
libx265-dev &&\
wget https://ffmpeg.org/releases/ffmpeg-3.1.3.tar.xz &&\
tar xf ./ffmpeg-3.1.3.tar.xz &&\
cd ffmpeg-3.1.3/ &&\
./configure --enable-gpl --enable-version3 --enable-nonfree \
--enable-postproc --enable-fontconfig --enable-libass \
--enable-libfaac --enable-libfreetype --enable-libmp3lame \
--enable-libopencore-amrnb --enable-libopencore-amrwb \
--enable-librtmp --enable-libspeex --enable-libtheora \
--enable-libvorbis --enable-libx264 --enable-libxvid \
--enable-x11grab --enable-libx265 &&\
make &&\
make install


Convenience copy for v3.0.3 from ffmpeg.org
  Code:
apt-get -y install build-essential yasm pkg-config libass-dev \
libfaac-dev libmp3lame-dev libopencore-amrnb-dev \
libopencore-amrwb-dev librtmp-dev libspeex-dev libtheora-dev \
libvorbis-dev libx264-dev libxvidcore-dev libx11-dev \
libx265-dev &&\
wget https://ffmpeg.org/releases/ffmpeg-3.0.3.tar.xz &&\
tar xf ./ffmpeg-3.0.3.tar.xz &&\
cd ffmpeg-3.0.3/ &&\
./configure --enable-gpl --enable-version3 --enable-nonfree \
--enable-postproc --enable-fontconfig --enable-libass \
--enable-libfaac --enable-libfreetype --enable-libmp3lame \
--enable-libopencore-amrnb --enable-libopencore-amrwb \
--enable-librtmp --enable-libspeex --enable-libtheora \
--enable-libvorbis --enable-libx264 --enable-libxvid \
--enable-x11grab --enable-libx265 &&\
make &&\
make install


Convenience copy for v3.0.2 from serviio.org
  Code:
apt-get -y install build-essential yasm pkg-config libass-dev \
libfaac-dev libmp3lame-dev libopencore-amrnb-dev \
libopencore-amrwb-dev librtmp-dev libspeex-dev libtheora-dev \
libvorbis-dev libx264-dev libxvidcore-dev libx11-dev \
libx265-dev &&\
wget http://download.serviio.org/opensource/ffmpeg-3.0.2.tar.bz2 &&\
tar xf ./ffmpeg-3.0.2.tar.bz2 &&\
cd ffmpeg-3.0.2/ &&\
./configure --enable-gpl --enable-version3 --enable-nonfree \
--enable-postproc --enable-fontconfig --enable-libass \
--enable-libfaac --enable-libfreetype --enable-libmp3lame \
--enable-libopencore-amrnb --enable-libopencore-amrwb \
--enable-librtmp --enable-libspeex --enable-libtheora \
--enable-libvorbis --enable-libx264 --enable-libxvid \
--enable-x11grab --enable-libx265 &&\
make &&\
make install


Step by step instructions:
Install the necessary tools and dev libraries (The web page linked above listed more dev libraries but they were not necessary for my build. It won't hurt a thing if you want to add them.) Cut and paste:
  Code:
apt-get install build-essential yasm pkg-config libass-dev \
libfaac-dev libmp3lame-dev libopencore-amrnb-dev \
libopencore-amrwb-dev librtmp-dev libspeex-dev libtheora-dev \
libvorbis-dev libx264-dev libxvidcore-dev libx11-dev \
libx265-dev


Download and untar your chosen ffmpeg source code. (I'm using the latest from ffmpeg.org here.) Change into the directory. Something like:
  Code:
wget https://ffmpeg.org/releases/ffmpeg-3.1.3.tar.xz
tar xf ./ffmpeg-3.1.3.tar.xz
cd ffmpeg-3.1.3/


Now we have to generate the make files with all the options we want enabled.
New: hardware accelearted h264 is enabled, HLS protocol is enabled, added --enable-libx265 to enable h265 (Sony?)
(This is fast.) Cut and paste:
  Code:
./configure --enable-gpl --enable-version3 --enable-nonfree \
--enable-postproc --enable-fontconfig --enable-libass \
--enable-libfaac --enable-libfreetype --enable-libmp3lame \
--enable-libopencore-amrnb --enable-libopencore-amrwb \
--enable-librtmp --enable-libspeex --enable-libtheora \
--enable-libvorbis --enable-libx264 --enable-libxvid \
--enable-x11grab --enable-libx265

- There should be no errors, but perhaps a few warnings (warnings are not usually show stoppers). I had no errors and several minor warnings on Kubuntu 16.04 LTS x86_64

Now we run the actual make process. Our heavy lifting is done so now it's the compiler's and linker's turn to work. Just set it loose and go get a nice cup of coffee or tea, maybe with a splash of milk. (This might take a while.) If you're up for it, look up how to use all your CPU cores and do a concurrent compile. It will go much faster BUT you must watch for errors. There are a few libraries and applications out there that will just choke and the only way to find out is to just try. I'm compiling single threaded and and enjoying a leisurley cup of Joe.
Cut and paste:
  Code:
make

- You will have some warnings, but they're probably OK. It's the errors that must be fixed.

Did you have errors? No? Jump down to the next instruction. Yes? You will have to try to figure out what went wrong. I think the most likely problem you would have at this point is not having all the right tools installed. Leave a comment and I'll do my best to help you out.

Error free? Great! We're finally ready to install this thing.
Cut and paste:
  Code:
make install

- This should be fast and easy. Now you're done. Jump on down to the Serviio server installation

-> nerd fun - Build an ffmpeg deb file << whoops, not so fun, Serviio didn't exit cleanly when I used an ffmpeg deb install, forget it.

Just a thought! - You virtual machine builders may want to take a snapshot here.

******************************************************************************************
Serviio server installation
******************************************************************************************
Notes:
This is the easiest part of the whole process. You may be wishing you had gone with the Windows or Mac version, but you're here now so let's do this.

I have chosen to install the Serviio under the /opt directory structure. Why? Because Serviio stores its data under its installation directory and I really dislike when programs store data in any of the ./bin or ./sbin directories (/, /usr, or /local). I see it as FHS directory polution. Just my opinion. Some days I'm just a little cranky. But seriously, install it where ever you want. Just substitute your path as appropriate.

I create a symlink in /opt called /opt/serviio. This lets me completely change the actual Serviio software to a different version or do a clean installation without having to change my desktop shortcuts or other scripts. Great for doing updates while preserving your database and settings! Just change the symlink in one place to the new / desired Serviio directory and everything else just works.

Highly recommended - Perform the optional steps below to create a dedicated user account with restricted rights to run Serviio programs. If you don't then you will need to set the appropriate file and directory permissions the way you want them.

Steps:
I decided that RAW image support would be nice. If you want this too then install dcraw. Cut and paste:
  Code:
aptitude install dcraw


Do I have to say to download Serviio? Nah, but I will anyway. Here's how I did it. Make sure you get the most recent version.:
  Code:
wget http://download.serviio.org/releases/serviio-1.7-linux.tar.gz


Untar your serviio-whatever-the-tar-is-called to /opt. You will do something like this:
  Code:
cd /opt
tar xf /root/serviio-1.7-linux.tar.gz


Make a symlink in /opt from your specific version directory to a generic directory link called /opt/serviio/ like this:
  Code:
ln -s /opt/serviio-1.7 /opt/serviio


The user and group will be essentially unset (set to some numerical value that may or not match existing UID). Do consider setting user and group information to an appropriately restricted user. See the optional steps just below. If you don't want to create a restricted user account then just set the user and group to whatever you like. You will find the server and console start scripts in /opt/serviio/bin .
Enjoy!

Just a thought! - You virtual machine builders may want to take a snapshot here.

******************************************************************************************
Create a restricted user account to run Serviio.
******************************************************************************************
Notes:
We will create a limited user account, set the ownership and permissions, and finally create a startup script and configure it to run at boot.

The way I'm doing it here, only the user serviio and root will be able to get to the log and config files. If you have a designated user that needs to get to these files just add them to the serviio group.

Important -> Did you make the symlink I suggested? All the commands below rely on that symlink you created.

chown does not follow symlinks by default. Add the -L flag.

chmod always follows symlinks.

Do not test run Serviio from the root account. Don't do it! Even though we're creating a user with no default shell, you can still use that restricted account to launch Serviio from the command line. I'll show you how. You do not need to test by using the root account. (OK, it is your system, so go ahead if you must. It's not my place to tell you what to do, but I wouldn't do it. I admit that I actually did test as root the very first time I started this write up, but then I rolled back to my previous snapshot.)

Convenience copies of the commands for adding the user and setting the permisions are right here for your convenience. See the individual commands below for explainations.
  Code:
adduser --system --group --disabled-password serviio

  Code:
chown -R -L serviio:serviio /opt/serviio && \
chmod -R o= /opt/serviio && \
find -L /opt/serviio -type d -print0 | xargs -0 chmod g+s && \
chmod -R ug+rw /opt/serviio

- The adduser command only needs to be run the very first time.
- The second compound command should be run every time a new version is installed.
- Add a user named serviio. (Whatever you want to call it is fine.)
- Setup the new user as a system user that, by default, will have no login shell.
- Create a group with the same name and use as primary.
- The password is disabled for tighter security.

Just a thought! - You virtual machine builders may want to take a snapshot here before you run Serviio for the first time.

******************************************************************************************
Run Serviio from the command line using our restricted user account.
******************************************************************************************
Notes:
Do not run Serviio as root. Don't do it! Even though our limited serviio user has no default shell and the password is disabled, there is an easy way to run the program. You do need to be logged in as root to run this command, but the command will run using only the serviio user permissions.

Steps:
Run the Serviio server like this:
  Code:
su -s /bin/bash -c /opt/serviio/bin/serviio.sh serviio

- use the super user command
- tell it to use the bash shell
- tell it to run the command /opt/serviio/bin/serviio.sh
- tell it to use the user serviio

The first time you run Serviio using the command above you should see "Created user preferences directory."
Ctrl+C to break out of the server. It will close cleanly.

At this point you could start the console with the script in /opt/serviio/bin but it's easier just to use the URL directly.
To test this from a different machine just change "localhost" to the appropriate IP address or URL. Don't forget to add "console".
  Code:
http://localhost:23423/console/


(A little off topic.)
An easy way to test audio transcoding fast is to set your device's profile to DirecTV and restart Serviio. This profile transcodes nearly everything, so pick a non-mp3 audio file and see if it gets delivered as an mp3 to your renderer.

******************************************************************************************
Optional performance tweak - setup a RAM drive for transcode operations
(this will be 10x or more faster than any SSD)
******************************************************************************************
Notes:
I do not know what the behavior with videos that are larger than the RAM disk is. I didn't test that aspect. Do some research and please tell me how it worked out for you.

This assumes you will use the system /tmp for transcoding. If you will transcode to a different directory you will have to modify the line you add to fstab.

Beware that if your total RAM is too low then all kinds of ugly swap file action will take place and your system will slow to a crawl. I tested with 3GB of RAM, I think 2GB would work too.

The noexec option is not appropriate if you will use this machine for compiling and building other apps. Build tests will frequently use /tmp to save executable files and then try to run them. I use the noexec parameter because my "NAS Gizmo" is not my development machine. I also use noexec on the entire /home directory tree.


Steps:
Edit your /etc/fstab and add the following line. Cut and paste:
  Code:
none   /tmp   tmpfs   nodev,noexec,size=25%   0   0

- There is no source device.
- Assumes you are mounting at /tmp (make this match whatever you set as the transcode directory).
- The tmpfs file system type is dynamic and only takes as much RAM as it needs without preallocating.
- The options nodev and noexec will help with security a little bit.
- I used size=25%, which uses up to 25 percent of the total RAM.
- 0 0 just standard dump etc. options.


******************************************************************************************
systemd launch at boot up script - for Ubuntu 15.04 and above
******************************************************************************************
Lifted directly from the wiki at: http://wiki.serviio.org/doku.php?id=how ... buntu15-04
They really made this easy.

create a file /lib/systemd/system/serviio.service
put the following inside of it:
  Code:
[Unit]
Description=Serviio Media Server
After=syslog.target local-fs.target network.target

[Service]
Type=simple
User=serviio
Group=serviio
ExecStart=/opt/serviio/bin/serviio.sh
ExecStop=/opt/serviio/bin/serviio.sh -stop
KillMode=none
Restart=on-abort

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target


Do the following commands:
  Code:
systemctl daemon-reload && systemctl enable serviio.service && systemctl start serviio.service


Just a thought! - Everything running the way you like? Now might be a good time to export your VM to a template file (OVA, OVF, etc.). You can delete those pesky snapshots too.
Last edited by SparkyHenderson on Fri Sep 23, 2016 4:06 pm, edited 5 times in total.
<<

DenyAll

DLNA master

Posts: 2009

Joined: Fri Mar 08, 2013 11:16 pm

Location: Adelaide, Australia

Post Thu Sep 22, 2016 7:35 am

Re: Installing Serviio 1.7 with ffmpeg 3.x on Ubuntu 16.04

Great post SparkyHenderson.
As a suggestion you can make this a little more readable by editing the post and changing all the [code language="bash"] to simply [code]. This will put all of your code into "code blocks". Let me know if you would like me to do it.
Also, appreciate if you could added this to the user wiki (http://wiki.serviio.org/doku.php?id=howto:linux:install).
DenyAll
Panasonic Viera CS610A | Panasonic Viera V20A | Sony PS4 | Sony PS3 | Panasonic DMP-BD79 | Yamaha RX-V500D | iPad | Windows 7 | Serviio 1.8 Pro
WinHelper | MediaInfo

Beta Tester, Moderator
Please do not PM me for support as any solution cannot be shared with others.
<<

SparkyHenderson

Serviio newbie

Posts: 5

Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2015 9:51 pm

Post Thu Sep 22, 2016 3:01 pm

Re: Installing Serviio 1.7 with ffmpeg 3.x on Ubuntu 16.04

Tweaked as suggested with a few edits. I'll figure out how to put this in the Wiki next.
<<

grinningdog

Serviio newbie

Posts: 5

Joined: Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:28 pm

Post Fri Oct 14, 2016 5:36 pm

Re: Installing Serviio 1.7, ffmpeg 3.x on Ubuntu 16.04 / Min

Thanks for doing this. To show what a newb I am, here's a question (probably not the last)

If I try the Convenience code for v3.1.3 from ffmpeg.org I get an error message saying:

Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree
Reading state information... Done
E: Unable to locate package libx265-dev


What's gone wrong?

EDIT: note - Linux Mint 17.2 Serviio 1.6.1
<<

SparkyHenderson

Serviio newbie

Posts: 5

Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2015 9:51 pm

Post Sun Oct 16, 2016 1:05 am

Re: Installing Serviio 1.7, ffmpeg 3.x on Ubuntu 16.04 / Min

Hi grinningdog,

Ah, the joy of Linux. This is really common with Linux installations. It tells you something is missing. Different distributions of Linux, and even different versions of a distribution have different libraries and packages in their repositories. Yes, I've totally overused the word "different". That's why the title of my post is so specific about which version of Serviio, ffmpeg, and Linux.

It's quite possible your distribution doesn't have libx265 or its development package. To double check try installing the library by itself.
  Code:
apt-get install libx265-dev

If you get that unable to locate package message again then it's not in your default repositories. That's not the end of the world. In truth, you probably don't need the H.265 features. This is a new feature to Serviio 1.7.x and our goal at this point is just to build the option into ffmpeg so it's there when and if we want to use it. It's only an option. Since you're installing Serviio 1.6.1 it truly doesn't matter to you.

To move forward without H.265 you need to make a small tweak to the "./configure" command of the ffmpeg build in my instructions. Find the "--enable-libx265" option and delete it. Done. ffmpeg will build just fine without it and your Serviio will run just fine without it. The only downside is that you won't be able to decode H.265/High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) video streams. Again, moot point if you're installing 1.6.x.

Here's an example from the ffmpeg 3.1.3 build instructions that includes H.265
  Code:
./configure --enable-gpl --enable-version3 --enable-nonfree \
--enable-postproc --enable-fontconfig --enable-libass \
--enable-libfaac --enable-libfreetype --enable-libmp3lame \
--enable-libopencore-amrnb --enable-libopencore-amrwb \
--enable-librtmp --enable-libspeex --enable-libtheora \
--enable-libvorbis --enable-libx264 --enable-libxvid \
--enable-x11grab --enable-libx265


See that "--enable-libx265" at the end? Just get rid of that option.

-- off topic --
1. Often times a new library will have a "back port" to older distributions. Somewhere out there in Mint land there may be a libx265-dev that you can install. If you have all weekend and a really good backup of your system then you may want to try this avenue. It's too much brain damage for me.

2. If you are a really newbie installer then I suggest you work through the commands in my document on step at a time. It's way easier to find glitches and to see the results of your last action. Make sure you understand the "&&" command that I use all over my instructions and the '\' at the ends of the lines above.

Keep going! You'll get it done.

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